Kids and Crayons

Very interesting list of tried and tested solutions for crayon marks on the wall.  I suggest you could have this list printed and pasted or placed on the fridge with a magnet for the time young Johnny or little claire decides to show her talents on the walls.  

oihem9

21 Tips For Removing Crayon Marks From Walls

  1. Toothpaste (regular paste–not gel). This one’s my first pick always (good old regular Crest), it also helps  clean up permanent marker stains pretty easily.
  2. Art gum Eraser – gently rub on marks in a circular motion, can also try a regular pencil eraser. Done carefully, this might be an option for wallpaper stains.
  3. Baking Soda – make a paste with water and use it to gently scrub the mark. You could also just sprinkle baking soda on a damp sponge and rub.
  4. Baby Oil – apply directly to crayon stains then rub off.
  5. Mayonnaise – Glob some on the stain and scrub a bit in a circular motion, then wipe off.
  6. Shaving Cream – apply to markings, rub in, then wipe off.
  7. WD-40 – spray some on the marks and rub off. Wash walls with hot soapy water once the crayon has been removed.
  8. Turpentine – dab some on a damp cloth and scrub into stain to remove crayon.
  9. Lighter Fluid – apply as you would turpentine
  10. Goo Goo – Same directions as for turpentine
  11. Ammonia – soak a section of cloth in household ammonia and scrub markings. You may also luck out with an ammonia based cleaner like Windex and a hot soapy cloth.
  12. Vinegar – soak a toothbrush in white vinegar and scrub marks off.
  13. Heat – Take a hair dryer to the crayon stain and allow it to heat the wax. Wipe heated crayon wax off with a hot, soapy cloth. You could try a clothes iron as well (no steam), just make sure it’s on a low heat setting so it won’t scorch the paint. Place a few paper towels between the wall and the iron.
  14. Hand Lotion – rub directly into crayon and wipe off.
  15. Powdered Dishwasher Detergent – make a paste with water and gently scrub area. Some detergents contain bleach so be careful on wallpaper.
  16. Powdered Household Cleaners – such as Ajax or Comet. Mix with some water or sprinkle on a damp sponge then scrub gently.
  17. Non-stick Cooking Spray – just spray it on then wipe off the marks. Not the best solution for wallpaper since this could leave a grease stain.
  18. Hairspray – spray generously on walls then scrub off the crayon.
  19. Mr. Clean Magic Eraser – go gently, you don’t want to rub off any paint.
  20. Rubbing Alcohol – Saturate part of a clean cloth then rub stains.
  21. Moist Baby Wipe Towelettes – Rub them directly on the crayon stains and scrub markings off. The homemade baby wipes should work too!
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Makeovers

If there is one thing that I LOVE to watch on the net, its gotta be makeovers ,, room makeovers, art project makeovers, pieces of furniture makeovers, things like that.  There’s a strange kind of excietment I feel just before going to the “After” picture. The pictures itself are so inspiring. One link I have found recently is :

    http://www.designspongeonline.com

I mean they come up with such creative ways to enhance old pieces of furniture or random crockery and stuff. Now these are things that really have me wanting to try something new as well. I will keep adding new links if and as I find them.

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How doodling could help you boost your brainpower

sun16Memory aid: Doodling helps people remember more and stop daydreaming

It seems those of us who covered our school books with scribbles may not have had an entirely wasted education.

For doodling may actually be good for the brain, scientists claim.

Far from being a sign of inattention, it is thought to focus the mind and stop daydreaming, allowing people to persevere with dull tasks.

Researcher Jackie Andrade, who conducted a study into the habit, said: ‘This study suggests that in everyday life doodling may be something we do because it helps keep us on track with a boring tasks, rather than being an unnecessary distraction that we should try to resist.’

Professor Andrade, of Plymouth University, asked 40 men and women to listen to a tedious telephone message about plans for a party.

It included names of guests, as well as names of people who would not attend, place names and other irrelevant material.

None of the participants was told they were to be tested to see how much they remembered afterwards.

The doodlers – around half of those who took part – had written down more names while listening to the message, the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology reports.

They also had better recall for both the party-goers’ names and place names mentioned in the recording – remembering nearly a third more than the others.

Professor Andrade said that doodling may help because it is simple enough not to drain brainpower, therefore allowing the mind to carry out a task without affecting how well it is done.

And by preventing concentration from wandering, it may help us focus better.